Future jobs, future skills

F1-e1445502546871.pngBy 2030, as many as 375 million workers—or 14% of the global workforce—could be useless in their jobs, thanks to automation.

That figure comes from the McKinsey Global Institute, which released a report yesterday looking at the displacement that automation will cause in the near future. Research analysts from the consultancy firm estimate that somewhere between 400 million and 800 million people will find themselves in need of new jobs as automation and machine learning creep into industries all over the world. Of that number, McKinsey suggests 375 million will have to switch occupational categories entirely. Continue reading

The nature of innovation

creativity.jpgAuthors of a recently published book, The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the WorldProfessors Anthony Brandt of Rice University of Texas and David Eagleman of Stanford University say that we keep begging as a society for more innovators, but we seem to be moving in the wrong direction in training them.

According to them, we are the only species which does things which are creative, and this is what differentiates the human brain from other species’ in this massive way. The human brain takes an input, mashes it up and puts out new versions. The point is: how can we shape the educational system so that we can make the most of this capacity in young people, largely untapped so far? Continue reading

The International day of the girl child: a potential to value

International-Day-of-the-Girl-Child.png11 October, the International Day of the Girl Child declared by the UN. According to a UN report, over 130 million girls are still out of school, which means that there are over 130 million potential engineers, entrepreneurs, teachers and politicians whose leadership the world is missing out on.

The global picture get gloomier if we look at the stats from the toughest countries for girls to access basic education. In South Sudan, where violence and war destroyed schools and families were forced from their homes, almost three-quarters of girls do not even make it to primary school. In Niger, only 17% of women between the ages of 15 and 24 are literate. In Burkina Faso, only 1% of girls complete secondary school and in Ethiopia two in five girls are married before the age of 18. Continue reading

Should good leaders still be learning?

followership.pngHow does experience influence the fact of being a good leader? And what role can education play in forming a good leader?

These seem pretty obvious questions, because of course both experience and education go hand in hand to create a good leader. The true question is, however: is it all about it? Is it enough to pair good education to a significant experience to automatically have a good leader? The answer is not as straight as it ought to be. Continue reading

Redefining our concept of work

How-to-Feel-Happy-and-Positive-At-WorkIn a 2013 survey of 12,000 professionals by the Harvard Business Review, half said they felt their job had no “meaning and significance”, and an equal number were unable to relate to their company’s mission, while another poll among 230,000 employees in 142 countries showed that only 13% of workers actually like their job. A recent poll among Brits revealed that as many as 37% think they have a job that is utterly useless.

They have, what anthropologist David Graeber refers to as, “bullshit jobs”. On paper, these jobs sound fantastic. And yet there are scores of successful professionals with imposing LinkedIn profiles and impressive salaries who nevertheless go home every evening grumbling that their work serves no purpose. Continue reading

Promoting inclusive growth: the AMNC opened in Dalian, China

huayuncp01.china_.comb8592d5b-8c87-bac4-6433-0-33eeec5c795026477b15b0ee8ac52203f429f70b.jpgThe World Economic Forum launched yesterday the Annual Meeting of the New Champions 2017 in the port city of Dalian, in China. This year’s edition will focus on the challenges related to the development of an “Inclusive Growth in the course of the fourth industrial revolution” and on all those policies, strategies and tools designed to successfully implement it.

The 2017 AMNC gathers government experts, representatives from academia and civil society with the aim of exchanging views and ideas about crosscutting political, social and economic challenges, whose global impact must be timely tackled. Continue reading