Deconstructing knowledge

Schermata 2018-05-25 alle 21.51.55.pngThe African Leadership University is likely to be one of the most recent examples of life largelearning. They aim at “decolonising” knowledge, broadening the horizons and making knowledge really accessible to every African students.

The issues at stake in this particular process of decolonisation are but irrelevant. First of all, closing the gap – at least, partly – between African students leaving to study in Europe or in America, and vice versa. As of today, the ratio is 10:1. In other words, ten Americans or Norwegians, for instance, exploring South African townships, for one Ghanaian who might make it to the Eiffel Tower. Continue reading

To learn is to be free

Meet Shameem Akhtar, who posed as a boy during her early childhood in Pakistan so she could enjoy the privileges Pakistani girls are rarely afforded: to play outside and attend school.

In this heart-warming, personal talk, Shameem recounts how the opportunity to get an education altered the course of her life – and ultimately changed the culture of her village, where today every young girl goes to school.

The search for aha moments

In 1988, Matt Goldman co-founded Blue Man Group, an off-Broadway production that became a sensation known for its humor, blue body paint and wild stunts. The show works on the premise that certain conditions can create “aha moments” – moments of surprise, learning and exuberance – frequent and intentional rather than random and occasional.

Now Goldman is working to apply the lessons learned from Blue Man Group to education, creating Blue School, a school that balances academic mastery, creative thinking and self and social intelligence. “We need to cultivate safe and conducive conditions for new and innovative ideas to evolve and thrive,” Goldman says.

Watch the full talk here…

The Davos education: innovating the present to enhance the future

DUUna2pU8AAZOBcThe World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, in the Swiss mountains, is now over. An occasion in which prominent personalities in politics, economics and sciences meet to tackle our present and future challenges.

This year’s topic was “Creating a Shared Future in a Fractured World”. What kind of fractures are we talking about? Political fractures for sure, for winds of hatred and intolerance blow from every directions. But also social cleavages, when inequalities are more and more evident and the world seems to have lost a proper direction.

Did our society really lose direction? Probably yes, but we are not drifted away yet. Continue reading

The nature of innovation

creativity.jpgAuthors of a recently published book, The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the WorldProfessors Anthony Brandt of Rice University of Texas and David Eagleman of Stanford University say that we keep begging as a society for more innovators, but we seem to be moving in the wrong direction in training them.

According to them, we are the only species which does things which are creative, and this is what differentiates the human brain from other species’ in this massive way. The human brain takes an input, mashes it up and puts out new versions. The point is: how can we shape the educational system so that we can make the most of this capacity in young people, largely untapped so far? Continue reading

The International day of the girl child: a potential to value

International-Day-of-the-Girl-Child.png11 October, the International Day of the Girl Child declared by the UN. According to a UN report, over 130 million girls are still out of school, which means that there are over 130 million potential engineers, entrepreneurs, teachers and politicians whose leadership the world is missing out on.

The global picture get gloomier if we look at the stats from the toughest countries for girls to access basic education. In South Sudan, where violence and war destroyed schools and families were forced from their homes, almost three-quarters of girls do not even make it to primary school. In Niger, only 17% of women between the ages of 15 and 24 are literate. In Burkina Faso, only 1% of girls complete secondary school and in Ethiopia two in five girls are married before the age of 18. Continue reading

Should good leaders still be learning?

followership.pngHow does experience influence the fact of being a good leader? And what role can education play in forming a good leader?

These seem pretty obvious questions, because of course both experience and education go hand in hand to create a good leader. The true question is, however: is it all about it? Is it enough to pair good education to a significant experience to automatically have a good leader? The answer is not as straight as it ought to be. Continue reading