The small problem of time, and how to make your life longer

astrology-astronomy-atmosphere-1151262.jpgI could count the times I hear this sentence every day: “I have no time for this”. It could be either me or anyone else pronouncing it, still I hear it very often, maybe too much. Time is a big issue. In philosophical terms, it could be considered within the boundaries of a lifespan, or it could be seen in a broader perspective as the whole time since the universe existed.

One of the best theories on time I have read of recently is the brilliant physicist Stephen Hawking’s. In his last speech before he passed away on March 2018, Hawking wondered whether he became more famous for his wheelchair and disability, or for his discoveries. Despite of his illness, diagnosed when he was in his last year of university, he kept on studying, researching and teaching and, admittedly, he “was not afraid of death, but was in no hurry to die”. Continue reading

The search for aha moments

In 1988, Matt Goldman co-founded Blue Man Group, an off-Broadway production that became a sensation known for its humor, blue body paint and wild stunts. The show works on the premise that certain conditions can create “aha moments” – moments of surprise, learning and exuberance – frequent and intentional rather than random and occasional.

Now Goldman is working to apply the lessons learned from Blue Man Group to education, creating Blue School, a school that balances academic mastery, creative thinking and self and social intelligence. “We need to cultivate safe and conducive conditions for new and innovative ideas to evolve and thrive,” Goldman says.

Watch the full talk here…

Redefining our concept of work

How-to-Feel-Happy-and-Positive-At-WorkIn a 2013 survey of 12,000 professionals by the Harvard Business Review, half said they felt their job had no “meaning and significance”, and an equal number were unable to relate to their company’s mission, while another poll among 230,000 employees in 142 countries showed that only 13% of workers actually like their job. A recent poll among Brits revealed that as many as 37% think they have a job that is utterly useless.

They have, what anthropologist David Graeber refers to as, “bullshit jobs”. On paper, these jobs sound fantastic. And yet there are scores of successful professionals with imposing LinkedIn profiles and impressive salaries who nevertheless go home every evening grumbling that their work serves no purpose. Continue reading